Friday, April 11, 2008

Doodles

Doodling – I think it is something that we have all done either as a child; while on the phone; or even on a scrapbook project. Whatever the case may be, the majority of people have doodled at one time in their life or another. But how do you take random doodling and turn it into stylish works of art? You start with [b] "The Doodle Formula" book by Adrienne Looman.[/b]
This 31-page, glossy cover book is not only fun to look at, but fun to read! While each page has simple to follow, step-by-step instructions; they are each arrayed with doodles that provide interest and keeps the different doodling techniques alive throughout the book.
Ms. Looman explains that there are only 3 elements of doodling; shape, depth, and filler. She also describes the different styles of pens by giving you the pro's and con's of each. One of the ideas that I found most interesting is that she does not feel that drawing is a "talent" rather it is something that can be learned and with "dedication, proper training, and time, anyone can do anything – even draw". With this thought in mind I read through her book, taking time to complete the worksheets that she provided on pages 11, 14, and 16. Once I had completed the book I still wasn't 100% sure about my ability to doodle. Up to this point, my doodling had only consisted of dots that provided outlines around an embellishment or title along with an occasional small flourish or two.
To actually doodle on a layout was not something I could even conceive at this point so deciding to start simple, I chose to doodle a "Thank You" card. To help get me going, I took Ms. Looman's suggestion of finding clip art to start the foundation for my doodling. (She also reminds the reader to be aware of copyright laws and if you are in doubt to check with the artist.) Because my handwriting is not the best I chose the font, "Cry Kitty" for the words "Thank U". I used the printed font as a springboard for my letters but at the same time, trying to make them my own interpretation of the font. Once I had the greeting completed I began to randomly doodle around the words by first drawing a circle with large flat loops as Ms. Looman did throughout her book. I also added a couple of flourishes and a heart that was shown on page 11. Using some fillers, colored pencils, and stickles my greeting was complete. As I began to layer the pieces together to make the card I realized the greeting looked plain. I began to browse through "The Doodle Formula" book once again to look for inspiration. On page 28 I found what was needed to complete the look of the card - a simple border around the edge of the dark pink cardstock. Now my card was complete and I was very impressed with my first doodle artwork! Also much to my surprise, my husband thought this was one of the “coolest” cards I’d made in a while!
thank-you-card

Title: Thank U card
Products used: Cardstock (Prism Prismatics)
Stickles (Ranger)
Colored Pencils (Prismacolor)
Pens (Slick Writer & Micron)
Adhesive (Adhesive Tech, Permanent Bond Glue Runner)

My studio is void of a clock which sometimes is a hindrance because I don't realize how much time I have spent in there. In my "Stuff to be Altered" bin I had this dime store clock that had been used in our barn for several years. I took it out of the bin, washed it off, and painted it green. I then cut out a circle from white cardstock that would be the new "face" of my clock. I began by creating a double border around the edge followed by adding the word and a crown. From there I began to let my imagination flow. I took a piece of Heidi Grace cardstock, cut out the flowers, and began doodling on the pattern to create a piece that would flow nicely with my design. Once again, I added fillers, colored pencils, and Stickles to my doodles and my clock now has a great "face-lift"!
Clock

Title: Dream Clock
Products used: Patterned Paper (Heidi Grace)
Stickles (Ranger)
Pen (Slick Writer & Micron)
Bling (Paper Studio)
Colored Pencils (Prismacolor)
Adhesive (Adhesive Tech, Permanent Bond Glue Runner)

Even though I had created two projects that were primarily doodling, I was still hesitant about doodling on a layout. What is it that causes me not to want to doodle on a layout? I am drawn to the look of layouts with lots of doodling, so maybe I was afraid of messing up? I tried to put my fears aside and realize that it was only paper I was working with, not 24kt gold. I really liked the layout that Ms. Looman created on page 21 of "The Doodle Formula" book and decided to use it as my inspiration for my page. I found this tree design on a piece of Tinkering Ink cardstock and I began to doodle on the flowers and the tree branches. I wanted to add additional color so I used colored pencils on the flowers and then cut it from the paper. The only picture that I had of my baptism was very dark and shows some signs of deterioration which is why I chose the Baptismal Certificate for my focal point. I still wanted to use the picture so I cut it out in a circle, doodled on one edge of the picture and used it for the center of a flower. The striped paper had a very faint design in the stripes which I found interesting and therefore I doodled over them to make them stand out along with defining the stripes. I painted chipboard a similar color to the background and outlined each letter to make them pop on the page. A few more doodles and my page was complete.
Renew
Title: Re-New
Products used: Cardstock (Prism Prismatics)
Patterned Paper (Tinkering Ink & Flair)
Pen (Slick Writer & Micron)
Paint (Making Memories)
Chipboard (misc)
Colored Pencils (Prismacolor)
Adhesive (Adhesive Tech, Permanent Bond Glue Runner)

Ms. Looman brings doodling down to a level that we can all understand and easily mimic. As I stated earlier, prior to reading this book, I had only applied dots around edges and designs on my pages, but had never focused a page or project primarily on doodling. I found her techniques very easy to comprehend and the idea of doodling very relaxing once I got into it. Each step was hard to start because it was an area I had never really spent much time with before but once I began, I realized that it freed my creative spirit and I actually had fun and enjoyed this side of me! If I am ever in a rut – I will sit down and doodle from now on because I think this is a key to unlocking a lot of creative doors.
All of my projects were first created in pencil and I kept a white eraser close at hand. I found that by sketching out my design first I didn't feel quite so intimidated – pencil erases very easily. Once the basic idea was on the paper, I then went back with my pens and other mediums to create my projects – it was that easy!
So what are you waiting for? Hurry and order your copy of "The Doodle Formula" book from Bluegrass Publishing!
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